Committee Information

Committee Name: World Health Organization (WHO)
Organ: Economic and Social Councils (ECOSOCs)
Undersecretary-General: Connie Chen
Deputy Undersecretary-General: Chase Wagers
Chair: Eric Chen
Topic A: Anti-Microbial Resistance
Topic B: Health Inequality in Crisis

A Letter from the Chair

Welcome to the World Health Organization Regional Committee for the Americas, 2018!

My name is Eric Chen and I am pleased to be serving as your Chair for this session of the WHO Regional Committee for the Americas. I am a member of the Class of 2018 in the Georgetown School of Foreign Service, studying Science, Technology, and International Affairs with a concentration in Global Health and a certificate in International Development. Originally from Falmouth, Maine, I was involved in Model UN throughout high school and continue to compete on Georgetown’s Model UN team. In addition to being on NAIMUN staff, I have served as Director of Marketing and Director of Media and Technology for our collegiate conference, NCSC, and as Director of Outreach and then Chairman of the Board of the Georgetown International Relations Club. Finally, I have interned at Save the Children US and the National American Red Cross and am very excited to discuss global health in crises at NAIMUN this year.

The World Health Organization (WHO) is a specialized agency of the United Nations (UN) that promotes public health around the world. Its priorities range from communicable to noncommunicable diseases, from nutrition to occupational health, and more. In the global health system, the WHO considers its role to be providing leadership, engaging partners, shaping the research agenda, disseminating valuable knowledge, and monitoring health, among other goals. More broadly, it seeks to mitigate the impact of disease, not just biomedically, but also economically and socially. In times of crisis, it also plays a critical role in directing the resources of the global health community.

This committee will be a session of the WHO Regional Committee for the Americas (AMRO/PAHO), one of the WHO’s six regional divisions. Rather than dealing with all issues on a global level in the World Health Assembly, regional offices often set guidelines for implementing policies and respond directly to regional crises. As such, delegates will be able to affect the health agenda of the region in the midst of a dire health situation. To do so, delegates will need to consider the various determinants of health and the impact that broad policy has on people’s individual health outcomes.

Please don’t hesitate to contact me with any questions that you might have! I look forward to meeting you in February!

Hoya Saxa,

Eric Chen,

Chair, World Health Organization

[email protected]

 

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About the Chair

Eric Chen is a member of the Class of 2018 in the Walsh School of Foreign Service studying Science, Technology, and International Affairs, with a concentration in Global Health and a certificate in International Development. He originally hails from a small coastal town in Maine and was involved in Model UN throughout high school. Outside of NAIMUN, Eric served as Chairman of the Board of the Georgetown International Relations Club last year, is a member of the Model UN Team, and was on the Secretariat of NAIMUN’s sister conference, NCSC, for two years. Eric has interned at the Save the Children US and National American Red Cross Headquarters in DC. He is incredibly excited for his last NAIMUN before graduating from Georgetown in May! In his free time, he enjoys playing guitar, relaxing outside, and watching The West Wing.

Learning Goals

NAIMUN strives to provide the most well-rounded educational and enjoyable experience to delegates. The learning goals for the World Health Organization are as follows. Delegates will gain:  

  • Awareness of the World Health Organization’s role in the global health system to help provide leadership, engage partners, shape research agendas, and monitor health globally.
  • An understanding of how different regions of the world are often exposed to a variety of public health issues and each region must set guidelines and implement policies to regional crises differently.
  • The knowledge about the various determinants of health inequality among countries with varying political systems, cultural beliefs, economic and healthcare structures and how this will impact the broad policies put into place.
  • A scientific understanding regarding the rising anti-microbial resistance globally and how this issue has impacted healthcare services in the past and how it will continuously affect future healthcare services, scientific research, and quality of life in the future.